GELATIN

 

The following report is on the importance of gelatin as a supplement for dogs with canine epilepsy or hip dysplasia, including studies that support it. Gelatin put into your dogs food daily and early enough could avoid arthritis.  My Lucy just turned 13 years old and weighs 60 lbs. I had an x-ray done last week and she has no trace of arthritis. Lucy has had gelatin in all her meals since she was a puppy.

A recipe for  no-cal, no fat and no cholesterol gelatin treats (similar to Gummy Bear's), is included. 

Take care and God bless,
Joanne Carson, Ph.D.,
Metabolic Therapist
Founder - Canine Epilepsy Guardian Angels 
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GELATIN

Gelatin (which a carnivore normally gets from eating things such as skin and tendons and cartilage) has anti-inflammatory and brain-protective actions, that are especially important during aging and under stress. Glycine, the main amino acid in gelatin, protects against seizures and brain damage. In a mature animal, gelatin can make up half of the dietary protein intake, but as little as two teaspoonful per day is beneficial for a 50 to 75 lb dog. For a pound of hamburger or chicken breast, a tablespoonful of gelatin may help to increase resistance to seizures. This is a VERY IMPORTANT supplement for epi's, and studies show how gelatin can reduce seizures.  Also, gelatin is fat free and cholesterol free.
 
To ensure that your dog gets the necessary glycine needed, you can add gelatin to his or her food. Gelatin is fat and cholesterol free. You can purchase plain, unflavored gelatin at any grocery store and sprinkle it on the food once a day. If you heat up chicken soup to warm the food, one way is to mix the gelatin in the warm soup.
 
NOTE:  Please use only unflavored gelatin, and not regular Jello or prepared dessert gelatins. The sweeteners (sugar or the artificial sweetener aspartame) and colorings in the regular Jello or similar desserts are not something you should give an epi, because they are not good for epi pups, and can possibly trigger seizures. Sugar can drive blood sugar up, and it will plummet afterwards, and Aspartame has given trouble even to non-epi humans: headaches, rashes, etc. We recommend staying with a name brand product like Great Lakes gelatin (or Knox if you have a very small dog) and not a "generic" gelatin, because the ingredients and process to produce gelatin can vary.

GELATIN DOSAGE: twice a day added to food:
10 to 25 lbs 1/2 tsp
25 to 50 lbs 1 tsp
50 to 75 lbs 2 tsp
75 to 100+ 1 Tablespoon
 
OR, below is a great recipe for gelatin no-cal treats for your dog:  They are like "gummy bears." You can buy gelatin by the pound from any health food store.  A less expensive, but quality controlled gelatin can be found at:

http://www.greatlakesgelatin.com/

Regular gelatin 16 oz. (1 lb.) cans @ $7.00 each
Beef Kosher gelatin 16 oz. (1lb.) cans @ 7.50 each  
(If you buy larger quantities the price goes down dramatically)

You will need:

* 1/2 cup of unflavored gelatin  
* 1/2 cup of cold flavored liquid (You can I used the cooking liquid from the crock pot healthy stew and any homecooked recipes)
* 1 1/2 cup of boiling liquid (you can use water, but part broth is fine)
* 9 x 12 pyrex pan.
* 1 or 2 quart bowl

Put 1/2 cup of gelatin in a quart bowl.  Pour 1/2 cup of cold liquid and let stand one minute to soften.  Pour 1/ and 1/2 cups of boiling liquid (water or broth) over the softened gelatin, and stir until all gelatin completely dissolves, about 5 minutes, or less.  (If you would like "chewier" treats, next time add more gelatin.)

Pour into a 9 x 12 pan and let harden.  Cut into approximately 1" by 3" strips (with shears or a knife) or a correct size for your dog. The finished product is rather rubbery and "bouncy" if dropped! Pills can be inserted into them (to hide), and may be swallowed before being discovered.

Again, here is where you can purchase bulk gelatin if you health food store doesn't have it....

http://www.greatlakesgelatin.com/

Regular gelatin 16 oz. (1 lb.) cans @ $7.00 each
Beef Kosher 16 oz. (1lb.) cans @ 7.50 each  
(If you buy larger quantities the price goes down dramatically)
 
REFERENCES:

Dr. Raymond Peat

Exp Neurol. 1989 May;104(2):113-7. 
Anticonvulsant effects of MK-801 and glycine on hippocampal afterdischarge.
Peterson SL, Boehnke LE.
Department of Medical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Texas A&M University,
College Station 77843.

Eur J Pharmacol. 1988 Jun 10;150(3):381-4. 
The glycine-prodrug, milacemide, increases the seizure threshold due to
hyperbaric oxygen; prevention by 1-deprenyl.
Youdim MB, Kerem D, Duvdevani Y.
Rappaport Family Research Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa,
Israel.

Brain Res. 1989 Mar 20;482(2):247-51. 
Age-dependent changes in brain glycine concentration and strychnine-induced
seizures in the rat.
Hunter C, Chung E, Van Woert MH.
Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New
York, NY 10029.

Vet Hum Toxicol. 1985 Apr;27(2):97-9. 
Effects of glycine and other inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitters on
strychnine convulsive threshold in mice.
Sangiah S.

Exp Neurol. 1989 May;104(2):113-7. 
Anticonvulsant effects of MK-801 and glycine on hippocampal afterdischarge.
Peterson SL, Boehnke LE.
Department of Medical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Texas A&M University,
College Station 77843.

Eur J Pharmacol. 1988 Jun 10;150(3):381-4. 
The glycine-prodrug, milacemide, increases the seizure threshold due to
hyperbaric oxygen; prevention by 1-deprenyl.
Youdim MB, Kerem D, Duvdevani Y.
Rappaport Family Research Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa,
Israel.

Brain Res. 1989 Mar 20;482(2):247-51. 
Age-dependent changes in brain glycine concentration and strychnine-induced
seizures in the rat.
Hunter C, Chung E, Van Woert MH.
Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New
York, NY 10029.

Vet Hum Toxicol. 1985 Apr;27(2):97-9. 
Effects of glycine and other inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitters on
strychnine convulsive threshold in mice.
Sangiah S.