MEDICATIONS AND DIETS THAT HAVE WORKED FOR EPILEPTIC DOGS

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Nan and Lesley:  Lesley is my 4 1/2 year old shepherd/rottweiler mix.  I've had her since she was just a baby.  She had her first seizure on Valentine's Day 2001.   She had another seizure on Valentine's Day of 2002.   I don't have Lesley on any medication right now.  I won't cross that road until her seizures worsen (if ever!!).  She has a delightful personality with so many wonderful qualities. She romps and plays and has great quality of life.   Please keep Lesley in your daily prayers.
Nancy and Dasha (pup on left):  My world of epilepsy began 2-1/2 years ago, although Dasha's began in June 2002, Age: 5 years, 5 months. She is a Siberian Husky, female, currently six years old, will be seven on January 12, 2004. Her coloring is red and white (cooper) with the most beautiful ice blue eyes. Dasha has GM cluster seizures and her longest seizure free period was 75 days, but sadly they eventually increased in frequency. She has tested negative for hypothyroid. Her litter mate (Cedar Chip), also pictured, has been seizure free for 29 months on 60 mg. Phenobarbital twice daily. It has been much harder to gain control of Dasha's seizures and we continue to work on finding what might work for her.

Medications and Food: Phenobarbital 120 mg. twice daily, Potassium Bromide, 375 mg. twice daily, Melatonin 3 mg. p.m., 1.5 mg. a.m., Taurine 500 mg. once daily, DMG, Well Tabs (multi-vitamin) and fresh carrots as snacks. Valium Protocol, Rescue Remedy & all natural vanilla ice cream as needed. Wellness Senior Super 5 Mix

Nancy and Haley:  Haley is a rescue Golden Retriever, adopted in August 2001 at the age of approximately 18 months old.  When both the pound and the rescue group had tried to spay her, Haley had seizures, both times when they put her on the table.  We adopted her when a prior placement had fallen through - they did not think they could handle an epileptic dog.  When the rescue group called us to see if we might want her, I hit the internet and found this group.  I wanted to see what we would be getting into, before we met the dog (I think I already knew that if we met her, we wouldn't be able to turn her down).  With the help of this group and my vet clinic, Haley has had only two seizures since we adopted her, and she is now 320 days seizure free!  On just the kbr, Haley went 165 days before we experienced her first seizure with us, a grand mal.  We discovered that she had low thyroid levels and added Soloxine.  The vet feels that the Soloxine will be sufficient and we are gradually reducing the kbr.

When she adopted us, she was a very friendly but timid, calm dog, weighing only 64 pounds.  When we got her home (after she spent the 35 mile trip laying on the floor of the truck without moving) she turned into a tornado.  Ninety miles an hour, racing through the house, counter-surfing for food, leaping on to beds and couches (not caring if they were already occupied), running over everything in her way, even our other dog, Bear (a 28 pound terrier/dachshund mix) and our 17 pound cat.  In the last 19 months, she has gained weight (now 80 pounds) and has learned some manners, though we are still working on training.  She is a loving member of our family, wanting only to be where we are, always wanting to be touched.  This is definitely her "forever home."  By the way, the cat now "owns" Haley - rubbing himself down the length of her back when she is laying on the floor, and even smelling her ears.  Haley just lays there, either afraid to move, or loving every minute of it!

Food and medication:  Haley eats Iams Adult Lite and as many dog biscuits as she can get!  She takes .4 mg of Soloxine twice a day, and is now down to 120 mg of kbr twice a day.

                                          

Olivia and Goldie: DOB: 2-90. She and I met when she was adopted by an elderly friend of mine at age 6 months. She is a yellow lab golden retriever mix. When my friend died (New Years Eve 1994) Goldie and her housemate, B.B., came to live with me, Richard and 8 other dogs. She was seizing then. I found the GAs and began learning about canine epilepsy. We got tremendous support and information from Judi, Sandie S. and Deb W. during the "darkest hours" where we were so frustrated at Goldie's deterioration that we actually considered euthanasia. When my Vet suggested thyroid testing, I immediately jumped at the chance to get it done. She worked with Dr. Dodds. We quickly discovered Goldie was severely hypothyroid (to the point of near death). Goldie began treatment with soloxine and quickly rebounded. She has been seizure free for 30 months now and is a happy healthy senior citizen.
 

Pat and Dixie:  Dixie, a smooth coated Jack Russell Terrier, will be eight in March 2003.  In addition to having multiple, acute and chronic illnesses as a puppy, she developed epilepsy at the age of two and a half. 

In the summer of 2000, her mild seizures increased in severity and frequency, and it became clear that medication was needed.  In August of that year, Potassium Bromide was started, and she is now on a relatively small daily dose of this medication.

After switching to home cooking and with combined traditional and alternative therapy, her chronic diarrhea and vomiting are non-existent, and her current ailments consist of mild, intermittent upper intestinal upsets, allergies (flea, various food, and summer irritants), a new yeasty ear problem, and infrequent seizures.

Medications and Food:  Potassium Bromide, home cooking with plenty of snacks, including assorted veggie plates, home made treats, DMG, Vitamins E and B complex, Taurine, Zinc, Lecithin, Sea Supreme, various Chinese herbs, when needed, and various Bach flower remedies, when needed. She no longer receives booster vaccinations, and this includes rabies, as well. We have run rabies titers with Dr. Dodds, and because of her excellent immune protection status, she is legally exempt her from NYC rabies booster. Dixie continues to receive and all the hugs, kisses, play, love and spoiling she can handle!

 

 

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